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Published by:
Copenhagen Business School (CBS) (2016)
Length:
25 pages
Data source:
Published sources
Topics:
Abstract:
Nordic countries are rarely associated with colonialism. However, Danish history contains both early colonies in Asia, the Caribbean, and Africa, and interesting to this case, Greenland. In 1824, Greenland became a Danish colony and remained so until it became part of the Danish kingdom in 1953. The empirical data for this case emanates from the collaboration between the Greenlandic and Danish police in 2015. Every summer, a group of Danish officers are sent to Greenland to assist the police force while local officers are on summer holidays. The case centers on a one-week course in January of 2015 that is provided to the selected group of Danish officers going to Greenland the following summer. The main focus is kept on how a group of leaders from the Greenlandic police, with Danish and Greenlandic backgrounds, present the upcoming experience and work to the Danish officers, as well as the officers' immediate reactions to this information. The case targets mainly master students who can conduct advanced power analyses of cross-cultural management, diversity-management or responsible management. The case doesn't have one correct solution. Rather, the students are required to engage in critical independent reflections about the paradoxes and dilemmas raised in the case. This case is part of the CBS free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/CBSfreecases for more information on the collection).
Learning objectives:
1. The student should be able to show knowledge about the Danish-Greenlandic historical development and how that influences current collaboration. 2. The student should be able to analyse and show what discourses / ideologies the Danish-Greenlandic collaboration is build on and discuss the implications of this relationship. 3. Based on the above, the student should be able to conduct a power analysis in which both subtle and explicit forms of power are identified. 4. The student should be able to critically reflect on the consequences of such power analysis for diversity management, cross-cultural management or responsible. 5. The student should be able to give theoretically informed recommendation to how the cross-cultural collaboration between the Danish and Greenlandic police officers can be improved.
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