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Authors: Regina List
Published by: Centre for Social Investment of Heidelberg University
Published in: 2011
Length: 6 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

John James, Programme Officer for Children and Youth at the General Foundation, had invested significant time and resources in an initiative designing and implementing new programmes to improve services for children and youth in disadvantaged communities. Luckily one community’s programme was already provided a grant to support implementation - under the condition of a matching fund by the government which had already agreed to enter into a partnership. Everything was just about to start when all of a sudden the counterpart agency called to inform John that they needed to conduct their own due diligence process which meant that each project had to submit its proposal to AC’s own International Experts Panel. After this unexpected turn John needed to balance the risks and opportunities of proceeding with the partnership with the government. As the students or participants jot down their own lists of pros and cons, and ways to minimize or overcome the risks, they can be drawn to the following themes or pastures: What makes a public-private partnership work? What factors could lead the partnership to fail? What resources are at a grants officer’s disposal to first assess, then manage such a situation?
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Abstract

John James, Programme Officer for Children and Youth at the General Foundation, had invested significant time and resources in an initiative designing and implementing new programmes to improve services for children and youth in disadvantaged communities. Luckily one community’s programme was already provided a grant to support implementation - under the condition of a matching fund by the government which had already agreed to enter into a partnership. Everything was just about to start when all of a sudden the counterpart agency called to inform John that they needed to conduct their own due diligence process which meant that each project had to submit its proposal to AC’s own International Experts Panel. After this unexpected turn John needed to balance the risks and opportunities of proceeding with the partnership with the government. As the students or participants jot down their own lists of pros and cons, and ways to minimize or overcome the risks, they can be drawn to the following themes or pastures: What makes a public-private partnership work? What factors could lead the partnership to fail? What resources are at a grants officer’s disposal to first assess, then manage such a situation?

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