Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.

Abstract

China’s strategic political, economic and military relations with Africa had attracted global attention in recent years. China had established a drastic and widespread presence in Africa, due to the demand for cheaper Chinese products and the need for huge capital investment for Africa’s infrastructure development. Africa, a continent known for its abundant natural resources and similarity to American ideology had been the main focal point for China’s ascension in Africa. Majority of Africans considered that the alliance with China would lead them to a world of enormous opportunities for attaining sustained growth and prosperity. Chinese engagement was also considered as an alternative to the influential Western interests who exploited the African homeland in the past. In accord with Africa’s belief, China had assured an amicable ‘politics-free’ development model for resurgent Africa, in-turn securing its vast untapped resources. This move was also favourable for China to sustain its economic growth and achieve political stability. At the same time, Chinese investments focusing on highly visible aids for establishing amicable relations with governments like building parliaments, soccer stadium etc, instead of numerous other development priorities had raised dubious concerns. As China’s relations with Africa exhibit a combination of neo-colonist approach, developmental partnership and economic competition, experts were skeptical in arriving at a conclusion about China’s motives behind their African relationship. Hence in this scenario, it remained to be seen whether China with its longstanding urge to become global superpower would become a lucrative partner and fulfill Africa’s dreams in a more constructive manner by fulfilling the promise of political equality and economic cooperation made in 2006 Beijing Declaration or act as a neo-colonist utitlising the ‘resource curse’ of Africa.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2011

About

Abstract

China’s strategic political, economic and military relations with Africa had attracted global attention in recent years. China had established a drastic and widespread presence in Africa, due to the demand for cheaper Chinese products and the need for huge capital investment for Africa’s infrastructure development. Africa, a continent known for its abundant natural resources and similarity to American ideology had been the main focal point for China’s ascension in Africa. Majority of Africans considered that the alliance with China would lead them to a world of enormous opportunities for attaining sustained growth and prosperity. Chinese engagement was also considered as an alternative to the influential Western interests who exploited the African homeland in the past. In accord with Africa’s belief, China had assured an amicable ‘politics-free’ development model for resurgent Africa, in-turn securing its vast untapped resources. This move was also favourable for China to sustain its economic growth and achieve political stability. At the same time, Chinese investments focusing on highly visible aids for establishing amicable relations with governments like building parliaments, soccer stadium etc, instead of numerous other development priorities had raised dubious concerns. As China’s relations with Africa exhibit a combination of neo-colonist approach, developmental partnership and economic competition, experts were skeptical in arriving at a conclusion about China’s motives behind their African relationship. Hence in this scenario, it remained to be seen whether China with its longstanding urge to become global superpower would become a lucrative partner and fulfill Africa’s dreams in a more constructive manner by fulfilling the promise of political equality and economic cooperation made in 2006 Beijing Declaration or act as a neo-colonist utitlising the ‘resource curse’ of Africa.

Settings

Location:
Other setting(s):
2011

Related