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Case
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Reference no. 9-711-S30
Spanish language
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 2010
Version: 30 June 2010

Abstract

This is a Spanish version. In 2010, the bicentennial anniversary of Mexico's revolution against Spain, Mexican President Felipe Calderon hoped he could orchestrate several crucial reforms that Mexico needed. Mexico had not grown much over the course of the last decade, losing competitiveness to China and other Asian countries. Several of its institutions, including labor, education, healthcare, energy, and antitrust, seemed uncompetitive. But with a weaker peso and greater governmental attention to infrastructure, Calderon hoped that Mexico's higher-tech exports could recapture US market share and make headway in Europe and Latin America.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2010

About

Abstract

This is a Spanish version. In 2010, the bicentennial anniversary of Mexico's revolution against Spain, Mexican President Felipe Calderon hoped he could orchestrate several crucial reforms that Mexico needed. Mexico had not grown much over the course of the last decade, losing competitiveness to China and other Asian countries. Several of its institutions, including labor, education, healthcare, energy, and antitrust, seemed uncompetitive. But with a weaker peso and greater governmental attention to infrastructure, Calderon hoped that Mexico's higher-tech exports could recapture US market share and make headway in Europe and Latin America.

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Location:
Other setting(s):
2010

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