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Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies", 2009

Abstract

The director of a student consulting program in a university hears about a way to globalize the program by partnering with an NGO in Wilmot, New Hampshire, WomensTrust, to start a microloan program in a Ghanaian Village. A meeting is called with interested colleagues, alumni, and students. There is support for the concept but several other possible scenarios are proposed. A go with Ghana decision is made somewhat unilaterally and without a business plan. Entrepreneurial enthusiasm abounds as in a typical start-up. The team must now quickly do its homework - get the buy in of the relevant stakeholders especially the Dean of the Business School, and the University Administration. The Dean would be concerned about the level of positive impact on students and alumni and mitigating possible increased overload on faculty. The University is concerned about liability and safety issues. There is a desire to make sure this is a triple-bottom-line social enterprise, which achieves desired outcomes of helping empower women to have more secure lives for themselves and their families. The people, profit, and planet aspects must be addressed. Is there someway of getting to Ghana without burning tons of carbon dioxide during a 14,000 mile round-trip flight? The model calls for investing $15,000 to begin a microloan program that charges interest to its peer lending group members and then becomes self-sustaining at 400 borrowers. How are they going to raise the $15,000 to start the process? It is an organic development model which starts with microloans and may grow into providing help with education, health, and meeting other needs if the women feel that is what they want. How will that be financed? What if the team doesn't get the buy in? The reservations cannot be canceled. The primary subject matter concerns social entrepreneurship which incorporates the triple bottom line. Secondary issues include financing new ventures, human resource development and motivation, globalization of collegiate curriculum with experiential/service learning methods, globalizing microenterprise, and entrepreneurship in a nonprofit.
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Abstract

The director of a student consulting program in a university hears about a way to globalize the program by partnering with an NGO in Wilmot, New Hampshire, WomensTrust, to start a microloan program in a Ghanaian Village. A meeting is called with interested colleagues, alumni, and students. There is support for the concept but several other possible scenarios are proposed. A go with Ghana decision is made somewhat unilaterally and without a business plan. Entrepreneurial enthusiasm abounds as in a typical start-up. The team must now quickly do its homework - get the buy in of the relevant stakeholders especially the Dean of the Business School, and the University Administration. The Dean would be concerned about the level of positive impact on students and alumni and mitigating possible increased overload on faculty. The University is concerned about liability and safety issues. There is a desire to make sure this is a triple-bottom-line social enterprise, which achieves desired outcomes of helping empower women to have more secure lives for themselves and their families. The people, profit, and planet aspects must be addressed. Is there someway of getting to Ghana without burning tons of carbon dioxide during a 14,000 mile round-trip flight? The model calls for investing $15,000 to begin a microloan program that charges interest to its peer lending group members and then becomes self-sustaining at 400 borrowers. How are they going to raise the $15,000 to start the process? It is an organic development model which starts with microloans and may grow into providing help with education, health, and meeting other needs if the women feel that is what they want. How will that be financed? What if the team doesn't get the buy in? The reservations cannot be canceled. The primary subject matter concerns social entrepreneurship which incorporates the triple bottom line. Secondary issues include financing new ventures, human resource development and motivation, globalization of collegiate curriculum with experiential/service learning methods, globalizing microenterprise, and entrepreneurship in a nonprofit.

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