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Case from journal
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Reference no. JIACS14-03-05
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies", 2008

Abstract

Are Affirmative Action Plans meaningful guidelines to employment decisions? Or, are these plans merely an exercise in satisfying legislative directives? The Central City Police Department faces these questions concerning their recent promotion list to sergeant. Specifically, what is the department’s justification for not promoting the individual with the second highest score on the promotion test? How can an individual with excellent performance evaluations and a clean discipline record not be promoted? Could it be the individual is a woman? This case explores the integration of minorities into a predominately white male work environment. For example, the organization as a whole (ie, city government) has developed affirmative action plans for over a decade. Only in the last several years has the branch level (ie, police department) developed separate goals addressing their specific operation. Branch managerial decisions over the years did not eliminate discriminatory practices. In fact, branch management faced separate lawsuits from African American and then Hispanic employees over employment discrimination issues based on race. Now, branch management faces the integration of a new protected class within the workforce. Will they follow their previous managerial behavior? The primary subject matter of this case concerns the alleged discriminatory promotion practices within a governmental agency. Secondary issues examined include the development and application of affirmative action plans affecting several protected classes. The case has a difficulty level of four, appropriate for senior level. The case is designed to be taught in three class hours and is expected to require three hours of outside preparation by students.

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Abstract

Are Affirmative Action Plans meaningful guidelines to employment decisions? Or, are these plans merely an exercise in satisfying legislative directives? The Central City Police Department faces these questions concerning their recent promotion list to sergeant. Specifically, what is the department’s justification for not promoting the individual with the second highest score on the promotion test? How can an individual with excellent performance evaluations and a clean discipline record not be promoted? Could it be the individual is a woman? This case explores the integration of minorities into a predominately white male work environment. For example, the organization as a whole (ie, city government) has developed affirmative action plans for over a decade. Only in the last several years has the branch level (ie, police department) developed separate goals addressing their specific operation. Branch managerial decisions over the years did not eliminate discriminatory practices. In fact, branch management faced separate lawsuits from African American and then Hispanic employees over employment discrimination issues based on race. Now, branch management faces the integration of a new protected class within the workforce. Will they follow their previous managerial behavior? The primary subject matter of this case concerns the alleged discriminatory promotion practices within a governmental agency. Secondary issues examined include the development and application of affirmative action plans affecting several protected classes. The case has a difficulty level of four, appropriate for senior level. The case is designed to be taught in three class hours and is expected to require three hours of outside preparation by students.

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