Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Case
-
Reference no. E77A
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: Stanford Business School
Originally published in: 2007
Version: 19 November 2007
Length: 18 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

This is part of a case series. In early 2000, Louis Borders, founder and chairman of Webvan, the newest and boldest entrant into the Internet grocery business, was reviewing the events of his recent board meeting. Sales growth at the company’s first distribution center (DC) was on schedule and the company’s publicized growth plan included opening distribution centers in 28 major metropolitan markets over the next three years. The Webvan board of directors had just made the decision to accelerate the company’s existing facility roll-out plan and would soon be revealing the revised plan to the public along with the company’s latest quarterly earning report. Although the board was still considering whether the company should make even more aggressive moves, all members of the board were very mindful of the primary need to execute well on the company’s grocery strategy. This case details the conception, business model, and launch of Webvan’s on-line grocery delivery service.
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2000

About

Abstract

This is part of a case series. In early 2000, Louis Borders, founder and chairman of Webvan, the newest and boldest entrant into the Internet grocery business, was reviewing the events of his recent board meeting. Sales growth at the company’s first distribution center (DC) was on schedule and the company’s publicized growth plan included opening distribution centers in 28 major metropolitan markets over the next three years. The Webvan board of directors had just made the decision to accelerate the company’s existing facility roll-out plan and would soon be revealing the revised plan to the public along with the company’s latest quarterly earning report. Although the board was still considering whether the company should make even more aggressive moves, all members of the board were very mindful of the primary need to execute well on the company’s grocery strategy. This case details the conception, business model, and launch of Webvan’s on-line grocery delivery service.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2000

Related