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Supplementary software
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Reference no. UVA-F-1636X
Authors: Marc Lipson
Published by: Darden Business Publishing
Published in: 2011

Abstract

This software is to accompany the case. Susan Johnson, founder and CEO of Medfield Pharmaceuticals, is faced with conflicting recommendations for extending the patent life of the company’s flagship product, Fleximat, scheduled to go off patent in two years. With only three other products in Medfield’s lineup of medications, one of which has only just received US Food and Drug Administration approval, strategic management of the company’s product pipeline is of paramount importance. But a recent $775 million offer to purchase the company has entirely shifted her focus. With this offer, Johnson has the opportunity to exit the business on a high note. Before making her recommendation, Johnson has to determine the value of the company, with a careful review of its existing and potential future products. But this is more than simply a financial decision, since Johnson-and Medfield employees in general-believe that the company is engaged in critically important work. This case is meant for undergraduate, MBA, executive education, and MBA exec audiences. It is taught as a core course, 'Financial Management and Policies,' at the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration.

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Abstract

This software is to accompany the case. Susan Johnson, founder and CEO of Medfield Pharmaceuticals, is faced with conflicting recommendations for extending the patent life of the company’s flagship product, Fleximat, scheduled to go off patent in two years. With only three other products in Medfield’s lineup of medications, one of which has only just received US Food and Drug Administration approval, strategic management of the company’s product pipeline is of paramount importance. But a recent $775 million offer to purchase the company has entirely shifted her focus. With this offer, Johnson has the opportunity to exit the business on a high note. Before making her recommendation, Johnson has to determine the value of the company, with a careful review of its existing and potential future products. But this is more than simply a financial decision, since Johnson-and Medfield employees in general-believe that the company is engaged in critically important work. This case is meant for undergraduate, MBA, executive education, and MBA exec audiences. It is taught as a core course, 'Financial Management and Policies,' at the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration.

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