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Authors: S Nithya
Published by: Amity Research Centers
Published in: 2011

Abstract

The rapidly rising price of non-renewable sources of energy had become a growing concern in India. The situation was severe, particularly in rural households which were struggling to find efficient and cheaper energy sources and methods of cooking. Many of these low income families were still using the traditional ‘Chulha’ (Stove) for cooking and heating purposes. This way of cooking not only increased environmental pollution but had also caused respiratory problems. Despite the abundant availability of renewable sources of energy in rural areas, the complete potential had not been harnessed due to the improper usage of the same. New technologies had led to inventions of cooking stoves which made efficient use of biomass, thereby providing affordable and efficient source of energy for people in rural areas. ‘Oorja’, developed by First Energy was one such innovative cooking stove, which used biomass (fuel pellets made from agro-residues) gasification technology to make cooking and heating affordable with lower carbon emissions. Having successfully made inroads into several rural households and commercial establishments in the states of Karnataka and Maharashtra, First Energy had planned to achieve pan-India presence and also expand to other developing countries like Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Kenya, Vietnam and Tanzania. However experts opined that the road to expansion will be challenged by established players both in India and abroad. Technological inventions leading to development of improved wood/charcoal stoves, was also a point of concern. The viability of binding environment conservation along with commercial sustainability would be put to test during the expansion phase. It therefore remained to be seen if First Energy would emerge successful in achieving its growth plans.
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2010-2011

About

Abstract

The rapidly rising price of non-renewable sources of energy had become a growing concern in India. The situation was severe, particularly in rural households which were struggling to find efficient and cheaper energy sources and methods of cooking. Many of these low income families were still using the traditional ‘Chulha’ (Stove) for cooking and heating purposes. This way of cooking not only increased environmental pollution but had also caused respiratory problems. Despite the abundant availability of renewable sources of energy in rural areas, the complete potential had not been harnessed due to the improper usage of the same. New technologies had led to inventions of cooking stoves which made efficient use of biomass, thereby providing affordable and efficient source of energy for people in rural areas. ‘Oorja’, developed by First Energy was one such innovative cooking stove, which used biomass (fuel pellets made from agro-residues) gasification technology to make cooking and heating affordable with lower carbon emissions. Having successfully made inroads into several rural households and commercial establishments in the states of Karnataka and Maharashtra, First Energy had planned to achieve pan-India presence and also expand to other developing countries like Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Kenya, Vietnam and Tanzania. However experts opined that the road to expansion will be challenged by established players both in India and abroad. Technological inventions leading to development of improved wood/charcoal stoves, was also a point of concern. The viability of binding environment conservation along with commercial sustainability would be put to test during the expansion phase. It therefore remained to be seen if First Energy would emerge successful in achieving its growth plans.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2010-2011

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