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Case from journal
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Reference no. JIACS11-05-12
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies", 2005

Abstract

In June 2002 Phillip McGuthry, a long time resident of Fort Mill, SC, purchased Hole in One Bagels, a small independent bagel shop with a great reputation in the community and a good customer base. The economic environment at the time of the purchase showed signs of weakness. In addition, the 911 terrorist attacks, and the low-carb diet trend were also somewhat worrisome. However, the bagel shop offered McGuthry a way to get out of the corporate world of advertising and step into what he thought would be a quieter more relaxed environment. However, after a mere five months McGuthry found that running the business was more challenging than he originally thought. Some months the business was profitable and other months cash flow was negative. He also found it necessary to hire a weekend manager so that he was not working 7 days a week. This added to his current labor expenses. McGuthry loved his new business, but was faced with some serious decisions if he is going to make the business profitable. The case looks at the challenges that face McGuthry as the new owner of Hole in One Bagels. The primary subject matter of this case concerns the purchase of an established bagel business during a period of economic recession and industry consolidation. The case focuses on the examination of financial strategies with an emphasis on cost analysis and the development of marketing strategies. The secondary issues include decisions dealing with relocation and growth. This case has a difficulty level congruent with entrepreneur majors with junior or senior status. In order for students to examine this case effectively they should have background knowledge in analyzing financial statements, and developing marketing strategy. The case is designed to be taught in one class session of approximately 1.25 hours and is expected to require four to six hours outside preparation time from the students.
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Abstract

In June 2002 Phillip McGuthry, a long time resident of Fort Mill, SC, purchased Hole in One Bagels, a small independent bagel shop with a great reputation in the community and a good customer base. The economic environment at the time of the purchase showed signs of weakness. In addition, the 911 terrorist attacks, and the low-carb diet trend were also somewhat worrisome. However, the bagel shop offered McGuthry a way to get out of the corporate world of advertising and step into what he thought would be a quieter more relaxed environment. However, after a mere five months McGuthry found that running the business was more challenging than he originally thought. Some months the business was profitable and other months cash flow was negative. He also found it necessary to hire a weekend manager so that he was not working 7 days a week. This added to his current labor expenses. McGuthry loved his new business, but was faced with some serious decisions if he is going to make the business profitable. The case looks at the challenges that face McGuthry as the new owner of Hole in One Bagels. The primary subject matter of this case concerns the purchase of an established bagel business during a period of economic recession and industry consolidation. The case focuses on the examination of financial strategies with an emphasis on cost analysis and the development of marketing strategies. The secondary issues include decisions dealing with relocation and growth. This case has a difficulty level congruent with entrepreneur majors with junior or senior status. In order for students to examine this case effectively they should have background knowledge in analyzing financial statements, and developing marketing strategy. The case is designed to be taught in one class session of approximately 1.25 hours and is expected to require four to six hours outside preparation time from the students.

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