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Case from journal
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Reference no. JIACS11-03-10
Authors: David K Smith Jr
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies", 2005
Length: 8 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This case can be used to stimulate discussion on at least four interesting and important issues: (1) How can managers grow and/or turnaround a business or an organization which is not doing well; (2) Are the same models and/or conceptual frameworks and/or data analysis tools which would be applied to this situation within a private sector (that is, business) context useful within the public sector context as well; (3) What sort of efforts are public sector entities (for example, states, regions, and/or countries) making to promote their economic growth and development; and (4) Will the model or conceptual framework or data analysis tool utilized by the analyst affect the data on which decision makers focus their attention and/or the alternatives they are likely to consider? Data in the case include: (1) Description of the challenge faced by David Seamon; (2) Descriptive information on the Missouri Department of Economic Development and its various units; and (3) Recent statistics indicating the number of contacts, the in-bound investments, and the trade investments generated by each of the State of Missouri’s overseas trade development offices. The costs of operating each office are also provided. This case challenges students to consider how David Seamon (newly-appointed Director for Business Development & Trade of the Missouri Department of Economic Development) can double (within three years) the annual number of firms from elsewhere in the United States and/or overseas who actively consider the State of Missouri as a place to open a new factory or a new office. From a measurement perspective, the case indicates that any firm making a written and/or electronic (web-based, telephone, etc.) inquiry to the Missouri Department of Economic Development will be counted as having “actively considered” the State of Missouri as a potential new location. The case is based on discussions conducted by the author with David Seamon. The case is appropriate for senior-level undergraduates as well as students in MBA and Executive Development programs. It is designed to be taught in a class session of 1.5 hours, and is likely to require a couple of hours of preparation by students.

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Abstract

This case can be used to stimulate discussion on at least four interesting and important issues: (1) How can managers grow and/or turnaround a business or an organization which is not doing well; (2) Are the same models and/or conceptual frameworks and/or data analysis tools which would be applied to this situation within a private sector (that is, business) context useful within the public sector context as well; (3) What sort of efforts are public sector entities (for example, states, regions, and/or countries) making to promote their economic growth and development; and (4) Will the model or conceptual framework or data analysis tool utilized by the analyst affect the data on which decision makers focus their attention and/or the alternatives they are likely to consider? Data in the case include: (1) Description of the challenge faced by David Seamon; (2) Descriptive information on the Missouri Department of Economic Development and its various units; and (3) Recent statistics indicating the number of contacts, the in-bound investments, and the trade investments generated by each of the State of Missouri’s overseas trade development offices. The costs of operating each office are also provided. This case challenges students to consider how David Seamon (newly-appointed Director for Business Development & Trade of the Missouri Department of Economic Development) can double (within three years) the annual number of firms from elsewhere in the United States and/or overseas who actively consider the State of Missouri as a place to open a new factory or a new office. From a measurement perspective, the case indicates that any firm making a written and/or electronic (web-based, telephone, etc.) inquiry to the Missouri Department of Economic Development will be counted as having “actively considered” the State of Missouri as a potential new location. The case is based on discussions conducted by the author with David Seamon. The case is appropriate for senior-level undergraduates as well as students in MBA and Executive Development programs. It is designed to be taught in a class session of 1.5 hours, and is likely to require a couple of hours of preparation by students.

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