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Abstract

Indian Wine was exposed to the world during 1800s, but after a sudden bout of epidemic, the vineyards were destroyed. But the Indian wine began to sparkle again after the vineyards began to take roots during 1880s to 1980s with renewed vigour. India had been one of the fastest growing alcoholic beverages markets in the world, but had negligible consumption of wine compared to all other alcoholic beverages. Despite having a large population of around 1.2 billion, consumption of wine in India remained low compared to other Asian countries. The lower per capita consumption level of wine provided potential opportunity for wineries to cover a huge untapped market. The changing socio-cultural factors and influence of the western culture had impacted the perception of Indian consumers for wine. In addition, increasing disposable income, changing habits, wine tourism, wine clubs and festivals, changing lifestyle, growing preference of women for wine, greater awareness of wine and easier availability through newer retail formats had given a fresh impetus for growth to the wine industry in India. Yet, industry observers were skeptical whether the wine manufacturers and marketers would be able to leverage socio-cultural changes effectively, given the fact that the industry was vexed with myriad tax regulations and paradoxical federal government rules and regulations.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2012

About

Abstract

Indian Wine was exposed to the world during 1800s, but after a sudden bout of epidemic, the vineyards were destroyed. But the Indian wine began to sparkle again after the vineyards began to take roots during 1880s to 1980s with renewed vigour. India had been one of the fastest growing alcoholic beverages markets in the world, but had negligible consumption of wine compared to all other alcoholic beverages. Despite having a large population of around 1.2 billion, consumption of wine in India remained low compared to other Asian countries. The lower per capita consumption level of wine provided potential opportunity for wineries to cover a huge untapped market. The changing socio-cultural factors and influence of the western culture had impacted the perception of Indian consumers for wine. In addition, increasing disposable income, changing habits, wine tourism, wine clubs and festivals, changing lifestyle, growing preference of women for wine, greater awareness of wine and easier availability through newer retail formats had given a fresh impetus for growth to the wine industry in India. Yet, industry observers were skeptical whether the wine manufacturers and marketers would be able to leverage socio-cultural changes effectively, given the fact that the industry was vexed with myriad tax regulations and paradoxical federal government rules and regulations.

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Location:
Other setting(s):
2012

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