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Case
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Reference no. 813-030-1
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: London Business School
Originally published in: 2013
Version: February 2013
Length: 21 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is part of a case series. Eight19 is a technology-based start-up company based on Cambridge Science Park. The company is developing a new (and very low cost) solar-panel technology aimed primarily at domestic use in developing countries. The case describes the issues faced by eight19 as it develops a business model for the new technology - in particular balancing competing needs: to generate sufficient revenue to fund operations (and not run out of cash), to generate a sufficient return for investors, to ensure widespread adoption of the system by users by users who cannot afford the up-front costs, to incentivise distributors, to guard against opportunistic behaviour by users, to create loyal users and to build and maintain a positive brand. The case illustrates the importance of the business model (rather than the product per se) and the imperative to build and maintain the 'social legitimacy' of a venture in order to assure profitability in the long term.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
< 5 employees (start-up)
Other setting(s):
2010-2012

About

Abstract

This is part of a case series. Eight19 is a technology-based start-up company based on Cambridge Science Park. The company is developing a new (and very low cost) solar-panel technology aimed primarily at domestic use in developing countries. The case describes the issues faced by eight19 as it develops a business model for the new technology - in particular balancing competing needs: to generate sufficient revenue to fund operations (and not run out of cash), to generate a sufficient return for investors, to ensure widespread adoption of the system by users by users who cannot afford the up-front costs, to incentivise distributors, to guard against opportunistic behaviour by users, to create loyal users and to build and maintain a positive brand. The case illustrates the importance of the business model (rather than the product per se) and the imperative to build and maintain the 'social legitimacy' of a venture in order to assure profitability in the long term.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
< 5 employees (start-up)
Other setting(s):
2010-2012

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