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Case
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Reference no. 9B11AC040
Simplified Chinese language
Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Ivey Publishing
Originally published in: 2013
Version: 2011-12-01
Revision date: 29-May-2013

Abstract

This is a Simplified Chinese version. Nokia, headquartered in Finland, was a global telecommunications equipment manufacturer. It operated Vertu, a luxury mobile phone brand that had pioneered the luxury mobile phone market in the late 1990s by using precious materials such as diamonds, sapphires, titanium, and exotic leather for phone production. The company had enjoyed impressive growth in almost 70 countries and had sold hundreds of thousands of phones in the eight years since its launch. On February 11, 2011, Stephen Elop, the new CEO of Nokia, announced a new mobile strategy to adopt Microsoft's new but unproven Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system. The market reacted poorly, and the company's share price took a 14 per cent dive on the day of announcement. How should Vertu respond to this new Nokia mobile strategy? Was Vertu well positioned to take the brand forward under the new Nokia? Should this U.K.-based wholly owned subsidiary be left alone and continue to be managed at arm's length from Nokia? Changes to Vertu were inevitable ' it was not a matter of if, but when.
Industry:
Size:
Large
Other setting(s):
2011

About

Abstract

This is a Simplified Chinese version. Nokia, headquartered in Finland, was a global telecommunications equipment manufacturer. It operated Vertu, a luxury mobile phone brand that had pioneered the luxury mobile phone market in the late 1990s by using precious materials such as diamonds, sapphires, titanium, and exotic leather for phone production. The company had enjoyed impressive growth in almost 70 countries and had sold hundreds of thousands of phones in the eight years since its launch. On February 11, 2011, Stephen Elop, the new CEO of Nokia, announced a new mobile strategy to adopt Microsoft's new but unproven Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system. The market reacted poorly, and the company's share price took a 14 per cent dive on the day of announcement. How should Vertu respond to this new Nokia mobile strategy? Was Vertu well positioned to take the brand forward under the new Nokia? Should this U.K.-based wholly owned subsidiary be left alone and continue to be managed at arm's length from Nokia? Changes to Vertu were inevitable ' it was not a matter of if, but when.

Settings

Industry:
Size:
Large
Other setting(s):
2011

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