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Case
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Reference no. IMD-3-1004
Published by: International Institute for Management Development (IMD)
Originally published in: 2001
Version: 27.12.2002
Length: 15 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is part of a three-case series. The case describes the evolution of Cell Network from a start-up of 5 people in 1997 to 2'000 employees in 2001. This evolution is divided into three cases and six short video sections. The (A) case describes the initial start-up phase, including focusing the business, venture capital funding, winning the first client orders, re-organisation, and diversification. The primary focus here is on: (1) What to look for in a start-up (how important is it for a start-up to have a clear concept as opposed to the drive to be an entrepreneur); (2) How fast should a start-up grow? (How important is it to achieve the critical size needed to exploit the business opportunity versus the need for cohesion in order to provide a reliable delivery of the offering); and (3) How to achieve higher growth (merger and acquisition versus organic growth). At the end of the (A) case, participants should decide whether Cell should grow organically or not, and if not, which of the three potential partners best fits its strategy. A video is available to accompany the case series. **EFMD European Case Writing Competition Category Winner 2001**
Location:
Size:
2,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1997-2000

About

Abstract

This is part of a three-case series. The case describes the evolution of Cell Network from a start-up of 5 people in 1997 to 2'000 employees in 2001. This evolution is divided into three cases and six short video sections. The (A) case describes the initial start-up phase, including focusing the business, venture capital funding, winning the first client orders, re-organisation, and diversification. The primary focus here is on: (1) What to look for in a start-up (how important is it for a start-up to have a clear concept as opposed to the drive to be an entrepreneur); (2) How fast should a start-up grow? (How important is it to achieve the critical size needed to exploit the business opportunity versus the need for cohesion in order to provide a reliable delivery of the offering); and (3) How to achieve higher growth (merger and acquisition versus organic growth). At the end of the (A) case, participants should decide whether Cell should grow organically or not, and if not, which of the three potential partners best fits its strategy. A video is available to accompany the case series. **EFMD European Case Writing Competition Category Winner 2001**

Settings

Location:
Size:
2,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1997-2000

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