Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.

Abstract

While one could buy a can of Coca-Cola even in the remotest parts of Africa, basic medication and health products were still inaccessible. Struck by this fact, Simon Berry (Simon), the founder of ColaLife, a UK- based non-profit organisation attempted to leverage Coke's supply chain to deliver anti-diarrhoea kits called Kit Yamoyo to rural Zambia. Partnering with aid and government organisations, Simon started a year-long trial of his concept called 'The ColaLife Operational Trial Zambia' (COTZ). Simon and his wife Jane created an anti-diarrhoea kit termed the AidPod, with a unique design to fit between the Coke bottles in the crate. Another unique feature of the project was that the kits were sold at a subsidized cost and the project design ensured that profits were made along the supply-chain. Aping Coca-Cola's value-chain, the Kit Yamoyos were delivered to the 'last mile', using Coke's secondary distribution system. A mid-line evaluation of the project revealed that the project was achieving its goals of increasing access to ORS for rural mothers and caregivers and saving children's lives. Infant mortality was a grave issue in Zambia, with diarrhoea being the second leading cause. With the trial coming to a close in September 2013, ColaLife was gearing to scale the project in Zambia and other parts of Africa. There were several challenges before ColaLife in sustaining the project, which had seen initial waves of success. The bottlenecks in 'piggybacking' Coke's supply chain and whether the end-customers would be willing to pay for the kits, were a few of the issues. How ColaLife would translate the lessons it had learnt from Coca-Cola in creating a sustainable supply chain remained to be seen. Could inputs from modern management practices in creating profitable and enduring supply chains help ColaLife? The case would attempt to address these issues and trigger a meaningful discussion for establishing the tenets of creating sustainable medical supply chains in Africa.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2013

About

Abstract

While one could buy a can of Coca-Cola even in the remotest parts of Africa, basic medication and health products were still inaccessible. Struck by this fact, Simon Berry (Simon), the founder of ColaLife, a UK- based non-profit organisation attempted to leverage Coke's supply chain to deliver anti-diarrhoea kits called Kit Yamoyo to rural Zambia. Partnering with aid and government organisations, Simon started a year-long trial of his concept called 'The ColaLife Operational Trial Zambia' (COTZ). Simon and his wife Jane created an anti-diarrhoea kit termed the AidPod, with a unique design to fit between the Coke bottles in the crate. Another unique feature of the project was that the kits were sold at a subsidized cost and the project design ensured that profits were made along the supply-chain. Aping Coca-Cola's value-chain, the Kit Yamoyos were delivered to the 'last mile', using Coke's secondary distribution system. A mid-line evaluation of the project revealed that the project was achieving its goals of increasing access to ORS for rural mothers and caregivers and saving children's lives. Infant mortality was a grave issue in Zambia, with diarrhoea being the second leading cause. With the trial coming to a close in September 2013, ColaLife was gearing to scale the project in Zambia and other parts of Africa. There were several challenges before ColaLife in sustaining the project, which had seen initial waves of success. The bottlenecks in 'piggybacking' Coke's supply chain and whether the end-customers would be willing to pay for the kits, were a few of the issues. How ColaLife would translate the lessons it had learnt from Coca-Cola in creating a sustainable supply chain remained to be seen. Could inputs from modern management practices in creating profitable and enduring supply chains help ColaLife? The case would attempt to address these issues and trigger a meaningful discussion for establishing the tenets of creating sustainable medical supply chains in Africa.

Settings

Location:
Other setting(s):
2013

Related