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Case from journal
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Reference no. NAC3141
Published by: NACRA - North American Case Research Association
Published in: "The Case Research Journal", 2011

Abstract

This case, aimed at an undergraduate or graduate-level accounting information systems (AIS) course, examines clinical processes, systems and controls associated with administering medications on a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The case, positioned from the point of view of a hospital's VP of Administration ('Sandy Payne') also gives students an opportunity to consider the viewpoints of the CIO ('Henry Sharp') and Medical Director ('Sudha Mehta'). It describes tragedies in which infants died after being inadvertently overdosed with blood thinners (poor information quality and poor process quality were implicated in these tragedies). The protagonist considers the possibility that AIS techniques, normally used to assess controls in financial processes, might be useful for assessing controls over clinical processes. The case also briefly introduces students to several US national initiatives that aim to improve clinical processes and outcomes, and provides an opportunity for students to consider; (a) how AIS techniques can help; (b) what else must hospitals do to ensure patient safety.

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Abstract

This case, aimed at an undergraduate or graduate-level accounting information systems (AIS) course, examines clinical processes, systems and controls associated with administering medications on a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The case, positioned from the point of view of a hospital's VP of Administration ('Sandy Payne') also gives students an opportunity to consider the viewpoints of the CIO ('Henry Sharp') and Medical Director ('Sudha Mehta'). It describes tragedies in which infants died after being inadvertently overdosed with blood thinners (poor information quality and poor process quality were implicated in these tragedies). The protagonist considers the possibility that AIS techniques, normally used to assess controls in financial processes, might be useful for assessing controls over clinical processes. The case also briefly introduces students to several US national initiatives that aim to improve clinical processes and outcomes, and provides an opportunity for students to consider; (a) how AIS techniques can help; (b) what else must hospitals do to ensure patient safety.

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