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Chapter from: "Service and Service Systems: Provider Challenges and Directions in Unsettled Times"
Published by: Business Expert Press
Published in: 2014

Abstract

This chapter is excerpted from ‘Service and Service Systems: Provider Challenges and Directions in Unsettled Times'. Unsettled times can arise from a variety of causes, including environ mental (eg, earthquake), climatic (eg, floods), economic (eg, recession), social (eg, illness), or political (eg, civil unrest). They can result in citizens' loss of homes/possessions, jobs, health, or mobility. Citizens move from above the level of consumption adequacy, where their behaviors reflect long-term and higher-order needs, to below the level of consumption adequacy, where they are forced into a short-term focus on simple existence. In parallel, (service) organizations-utilities, transport, medical, cleaning, housing, education, broadcasting, national and local government-may become ineffective or unavailable: in other words, beyond the means of a significant proportion of citizens. This book explores the effect of unsettled times on spatial service systems. It provides original insights for managers of service organizations (especially public services), policy makers, and service system researchers and students.

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Abstract

This chapter is excerpted from ‘Service and Service Systems: Provider Challenges and Directions in Unsettled Times'. Unsettled times can arise from a variety of causes, including environ mental (eg, earthquake), climatic (eg, floods), economic (eg, recession), social (eg, illness), or political (eg, civil unrest). They can result in citizens' loss of homes/possessions, jobs, health, or mobility. Citizens move from above the level of consumption adequacy, where their behaviors reflect long-term and higher-order needs, to below the level of consumption adequacy, where they are forced into a short-term focus on simple existence. In parallel, (service) organizations-utilities, transport, medical, cleaning, housing, education, broadcasting, national and local government-may become ineffective or unavailable: in other words, beyond the means of a significant proportion of citizens. This book explores the effect of unsettled times on spatial service systems. It provides original insights for managers of service organizations (especially public services), policy makers, and service system researchers and students.

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