Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Management article
-
Reference no. AMSJ09-07
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Academy of Marketing Studies Journal", 2005
Length: 8 pages

Abstract

South African venison offers a healthy alternative to other red meat types such as beef and lamb as it results from animals in their natural habitat, is free from human intervention in terms of hormones and antibiotics and is characterized by low levels of fat and high levels of protein. When consumers have to choose between meats, they often base their comparisons on subtle differences in the attributes of the products. One of the most popular attributes is that of perceived quality. Since the consumption of venison in South Africa is still low and little research into consumers' quality perceptions could be found, this study investigated the importance South African venison consumers attached to a variety of quality cues. Sensory cues, particularly at point-of-purchase, but also at point-of consumption, were found to be the most important in judging the quality of venison. These were followed by point-of-purchase information cues. Prior-to-purchase cues such as origin of the meat, the treatment of the animal in the slaughtering process and the use of hormones were least important.

About

Abstract

South African venison offers a healthy alternative to other red meat types such as beef and lamb as it results from animals in their natural habitat, is free from human intervention in terms of hormones and antibiotics and is characterized by low levels of fat and high levels of protein. When consumers have to choose between meats, they often base their comparisons on subtle differences in the attributes of the products. One of the most popular attributes is that of perceived quality. Since the consumption of venison in South Africa is still low and little research into consumers' quality perceptions could be found, this study investigated the importance South African venison consumers attached to a variety of quality cues. Sensory cues, particularly at point-of-purchase, but also at point-of consumption, were found to be the most important in judging the quality of venison. These were followed by point-of-purchase information cues. Prior-to-purchase cues such as origin of the meat, the treatment of the animal in the slaughtering process and the use of hormones were least important.

Related