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Book chapter
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Reference no. BEP2052
Chapter from: "The Economics of Crime"
Published by: Business Expert Press
Published in: 2013

Abstract

This chapter is excerpted from ‘The Economics of Crime'. This book will guide readers to an understanding of effective public policy designed to reduce criminality. By understanding how incentive mechanisms affect criminal behavior, business managers may use this information either to reduce criminal activity in their own enterprises or to understand how unethical business decisions affect the wider society. As we always do in such circumstances, we must make sacrifices to balance the competing interests. To accomplish this with a minimum of disruption, at the end of many chapters there is a section called 'For the Economist' where additional material of a more advanced mathematical and theoretical nature, which tends to be more tangential to the non-economists, is provided. In so doing, economics students, who typically have an advanced knowledge of modeling, can be trained in a parallel fashion to those for whom economics is a new field and, as such, may have only had a high school or introductory level exposure to economic science, if any at all.

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Abstract

This chapter is excerpted from ‘The Economics of Crime'. This book will guide readers to an understanding of effective public policy designed to reduce criminality. By understanding how incentive mechanisms affect criminal behavior, business managers may use this information either to reduce criminal activity in their own enterprises or to understand how unethical business decisions affect the wider society. As we always do in such circumstances, we must make sacrifices to balance the competing interests. To accomplish this with a minimum of disruption, at the end of many chapters there is a section called 'For the Economist' where additional material of a more advanced mathematical and theoretical nature, which tends to be more tangential to the non-economists, is provided. In so doing, economics students, who typically have an advanced knowledge of modeling, can be trained in a parallel fashion to those for whom economics is a new field and, as such, may have only had a high school or introductory level exposure to economic science, if any at all.

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