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Published by: Allied Business Academies
Published in: "Academy of Marketing Studies Journal", 2001
Length: 17 pages

Abstract

Consumers often do not conduct their purchase decision processes autonomously. Rather, purchase decisions have been characterized as being autonomous (a purchase decision controlled by the self), subcontracted (a purchase decision controlled by another), or hybrid (a purchase decision possessing characteristics of both). This conceptual paper examines the perceived control and consumer research literatures to glean a better theoretical understanding of antecedents and outcomes of such decision styles. The Motivation, Opportunity, and Ability framework is utilized to develop a classification system of antecedent factors that may be useful for understanding and predicting the incidence of these differing decision types. Managerially relevant implications and opportunities for future research are suggested.

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Abstract

Consumers often do not conduct their purchase decision processes autonomously. Rather, purchase decisions have been characterized as being autonomous (a purchase decision controlled by the self), subcontracted (a purchase decision controlled by another), or hybrid (a purchase decision possessing characteristics of both). This conceptual paper examines the perceived control and consumer research literatures to glean a better theoretical understanding of antecedents and outcomes of such decision styles. The Motivation, Opportunity, and Ability framework is utilized to develop a classification system of antecedent factors that may be useful for understanding and predicting the incidence of these differing decision types. Managerially relevant implications and opportunities for future research are suggested.

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