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Abstract

The recent economic developments and ongoing social changes had provided better workplace opportunities to women. The traditional role model of women in the society had been transformed as they acquired higher education and business skills. A greater number of women employees had emerged in both developed and developing economies. The subsequent economic development of women was accompanied by reduction in the gender gap and acceptance in the workforce, particularly in the service and the manufacturing fields. The establishment of People’s Republic of China (1949) initiated move towards gender equality at workplace, enhancing national productivity and economic growth. In modern China, women became an essential part of the workforce, leading to gender diversity and equal status in workplace. However, gender discrimination still persisted in the country in some form or the other. As a result of higher education, professionally well equipped Chinese women preferred to explore foreign employment/business opportunities. It was therefore critical for the Chinese government to address the issue of gender equality for achieving sustainable social and economic development of the country. Chinese cultural revolutions in 1960s and 1970s had heralded women’s equal opportunity at work. Chairman Mao’s support and commitment in achieving gender equality was instrumental in raising the status of women in China. Women needed to make relentless efforts to break the corporate glass ceiling. Against this backdrop, it remained to be seen whether women in China would succeed in the face of multiple challenges to attain gender equality in the traditionally patriarchal Chinese society.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2014

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Abstract

The recent economic developments and ongoing social changes had provided better workplace opportunities to women. The traditional role model of women in the society had been transformed as they acquired higher education and business skills. A greater number of women employees had emerged in both developed and developing economies. The subsequent economic development of women was accompanied by reduction in the gender gap and acceptance in the workforce, particularly in the service and the manufacturing fields. The establishment of People’s Republic of China (1949) initiated move towards gender equality at workplace, enhancing national productivity and economic growth. In modern China, women became an essential part of the workforce, leading to gender diversity and equal status in workplace. However, gender discrimination still persisted in the country in some form or the other. As a result of higher education, professionally well equipped Chinese women preferred to explore foreign employment/business opportunities. It was therefore critical for the Chinese government to address the issue of gender equality for achieving sustainable social and economic development of the country. Chinese cultural revolutions in 1960s and 1970s had heralded women’s equal opportunity at work. Chairman Mao’s support and commitment in achieving gender equality was instrumental in raising the status of women in China. Women needed to make relentless efforts to break the corporate glass ceiling. Against this backdrop, it remained to be seen whether women in China would succeed in the face of multiple challenges to attain gender equality in the traditionally patriarchal Chinese society.

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Location:
Other setting(s):
2014

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