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Abstract

Generation (Gen) Z was a young, talented and markedly different from the earlier generations, having been born in a fully digitised economy. As a largest generational group in the US, it was in the process of overtaking the millennials and resembled a ‘demographic tsunami’. They had marched beyond the traditional societal pressures of becoming doctor or engineer, as they were highly engaged, socially conscious and had high technical skills. Organisations had a mammoth task before them to understand their attitudes, behaviours and life pattern, as the new generation was gearing up for the corporate world. Acknowledged as ‘Digital Natives’, the Gen Z had evolved in the digital age and was likely to be established in the corporate world by 2017. Organisations would have to gear themselves up to meet the workplace intricacies arising from generational change. Values cherished by Gen Z included self-reliance, personal freedom, transparency and flexibility. HR had to positively respond to the needs of Gen Z so as to attract, motivate, retain and fully engage this future generation. Communication processes had to be redefined as they shifted from the direct to collaborative and consultative systems, necessitating changes in the corporate operating models with reference to leadership styles, corporate communication, work flexibility and social media policies. As Gen Z was capable of working from any location/organisation, it created a retention issue for organisations. Some organisations opined that they did not expect lifelong loyalty from Gen Z, but they did expect them to be totally committed to work. Therefore, it remained to be seen whether organisations would successfully attract, motivate and engage Gen Z within the confines of a complex business world.
Location:
Other setting(s):
2014

About

Abstract

Generation (Gen) Z was a young, talented and markedly different from the earlier generations, having been born in a fully digitised economy. As a largest generational group in the US, it was in the process of overtaking the millennials and resembled a ‘demographic tsunami’. They had marched beyond the traditional societal pressures of becoming doctor or engineer, as they were highly engaged, socially conscious and had high technical skills. Organisations had a mammoth task before them to understand their attitudes, behaviours and life pattern, as the new generation was gearing up for the corporate world. Acknowledged as ‘Digital Natives’, the Gen Z had evolved in the digital age and was likely to be established in the corporate world by 2017. Organisations would have to gear themselves up to meet the workplace intricacies arising from generational change. Values cherished by Gen Z included self-reliance, personal freedom, transparency and flexibility. HR had to positively respond to the needs of Gen Z so as to attract, motivate, retain and fully engage this future generation. Communication processes had to be redefined as they shifted from the direct to collaborative and consultative systems, necessitating changes in the corporate operating models with reference to leadership styles, corporate communication, work flexibility and social media policies. As Gen Z was capable of working from any location/organisation, it created a retention issue for organisations. Some organisations opined that they did not expect lifelong loyalty from Gen Z, but they did expect them to be totally committed to work. Therefore, it remained to be seen whether organisations would successfully attract, motivate and engage Gen Z within the confines of a complex business world.

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Location:
Other setting(s):
2014

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