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Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 2018
Version: 6 March 2018
Revision date: 28-Mar-2019
Length: 29 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

In 2014, Dr Charles D Fraser Jr, Surgeon-in-Chief of Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, was contemplating the future direction of the congenital heart disease program. The nation's largest pediatric hospital, Texas Children's was ranked by US News & World Report as #4 in the nation in 2012-2013. It was ranked #3 in pediatric heart care and heart surgery, following Boston Children's and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Texas Children's had some of the highest volumes in the nation, seeing more than 20,000 congenital heart disease patients and performing over 800 cardiac surgeries annually. Fraser led the reorganization of Texas Children's care for congenital heart disease conditions beginning in 1995, and had initiated universal outcome measurement. In 2014, the challenge was to continue to improve care in a complicated patient population, and take outcome measurement to a new level. Also, Texas Children's had recently formed partnerships with pediatric hospitals in Temple, San Antonio and Mexico City, and how to structure these partnerships was under active discussion.
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Abstract

In 2014, Dr Charles D Fraser Jr, Surgeon-in-Chief of Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, was contemplating the future direction of the congenital heart disease program. The nation's largest pediatric hospital, Texas Children's was ranked by US News & World Report as #4 in the nation in 2012-2013. It was ranked #3 in pediatric heart care and heart surgery, following Boston Children's and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Texas Children's had some of the highest volumes in the nation, seeing more than 20,000 congenital heart disease patients and performing over 800 cardiac surgeries annually. Fraser led the reorganization of Texas Children's care for congenital heart disease conditions beginning in 1995, and had initiated universal outcome measurement. In 2014, the challenge was to continue to improve care in a complicated patient population, and take outcome measurement to a new level. Also, Texas Children's had recently formed partnerships with pediatric hospitals in Temple, San Antonio and Mexico City, and how to structure these partnerships was under active discussion.

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