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Abstract

Part of the Babson Worldwide Collection. The Babson Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project (BEEP) was established in 2010 following the publication of 'How to Start an Entrepreneurial Revolution'. The article contributed to the widespread recognition that entrepreneurship blossoms in a given region as the result of a complex interaction of many different domains and actors, including universities and human capital, providers of capital, corporations, policy makers, NGOs, and foundations (see Exhibit TN-1). The 2010 Harvard Business Review (HBR) article made the term 'entrepreneurship ecosystem' prominent for the first time, reflecting this dynamic and largely self-regulating system. The SE (formerly, Southern Energy) case enriches this dialog on engaging larger corporations in fostering entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship ecosystems and helps the discussion transcend polemic prescription and overly simplistic stereotypes of what larger corporations should or should not do. The case also highlights the potential benefits for larger corporations by engaging with entrepreneurial ventures.

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Abstract

Part of the Babson Worldwide Collection. The Babson Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project (BEEP) was established in 2010 following the publication of 'How to Start an Entrepreneurial Revolution'. The article contributed to the widespread recognition that entrepreneurship blossoms in a given region as the result of a complex interaction of many different domains and actors, including universities and human capital, providers of capital, corporations, policy makers, NGOs, and foundations (see Exhibit TN-1). The 2010 Harvard Business Review (HBR) article made the term 'entrepreneurship ecosystem' prominent for the first time, reflecting this dynamic and largely self-regulating system. The SE (formerly, Southern Energy) case enriches this dialog on engaging larger corporations in fostering entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship ecosystems and helps the discussion transcend polemic prescription and overly simplistic stereotypes of what larger corporations should or should not do. The case also highlights the potential benefits for larger corporations by engaging with entrepreneurial ventures.

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