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Note
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Reference no. UVA-E-0169
Authors: Donna Wood
Published by: Darden Business Publishing
Published in: 1999
Length: 7 pages

Abstract

Justice is ordinarily defined as ''fairness'', but the meaning of fairness suggests both a comparative element (i.e., treating equals as equals, except when they have relevant differences and concomitant forms of equal opportunity) and a noncomparative element (i.e., the notion that each person should be given her due - what is owed, earned, needed, or deserved). This note discusses how various systems, processes, and outcomes can be considered fair (or unfair) from these two perspectives.

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Abstract

Justice is ordinarily defined as ''fairness'', but the meaning of fairness suggests both a comparative element (i.e., treating equals as equals, except when they have relevant differences and concomitant forms of equal opportunity) and a noncomparative element (i.e., the notion that each person should be given her due - what is owed, earned, needed, or deserved). This note discusses how various systems, processes, and outcomes can be considered fair (or unfair) from these two perspectives.

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