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Case from journal
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Reference no. JIACS20-05-06
Published by: Allied Business Academies
Originally published in: "Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies", 2014
Revision date: 04-Oct-2018
Length: 6 pages
Data source: Generalised experience

Abstract

The case concerns the humble beginnings followed by the rapid expansion and subsequent decline of the New Revival organization. New Revival Church ('the church') started as a small congregation in Brooklyn, New York. The church grew based on the charisma of its young minister, Pastor Thomas. The minister created an oversight board, the Board of Elders, to provide structure and to make decisions on behalf of the organization. However, decisions such as the building of a new church building, the expansion of New Revival through the creation of daughter churches, and the acquisition of bank loans, were made by the minister without prior board approval. The case demonstrates the challenges faced by some nonprofit organizations especially religious organizations, when management control is centralized and the corporate governance structure is either ineffective or nonexistence.

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Abstract

The case concerns the humble beginnings followed by the rapid expansion and subsequent decline of the New Revival organization. New Revival Church ('the church') started as a small congregation in Brooklyn, New York. The church grew based on the charisma of its young minister, Pastor Thomas. The minister created an oversight board, the Board of Elders, to provide structure and to make decisions on behalf of the organization. However, decisions such as the building of a new church building, the expansion of New Revival through the creation of daughter churches, and the acquisition of bank loans, were made by the minister without prior board approval. The case demonstrates the challenges faced by some nonprofit organizations especially religious organizations, when management control is centralized and the corporate governance structure is either ineffective or nonexistence.

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