Product details

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Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: The Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship at MIT
Originally published in: 2018
Version: July 2017
Revision date: 01-Mar-2019
Length: 18 pages
Data source: Published sources
Notes: This item is part of a free case collection. For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

In July 2017, MAX (Metro African eXpress) was paving the way for an ecommerce boom in Lagos, Nigeria by creating the city's first reliable same-day delivery service. MAX used an on-demand mobile platform to match delivery requests with highly vetted and trained motorcycle couriers. This growing, loudly-branded fleet of 66 contract drivers was making 500 deliveries per day, creating new opportunities for small businesses. Cofounder Tayo Bamiduro was eager to scale, but how? Should MAX continue expanding within Lagos, or was it time to branch out? And should the company continue to focus on its core motorcycle delivery and taxi services, or should it dedicate resources toward converting its proprietary mapping standards and driver licensing into new products? This case is part of the Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/legatum for more information on the collection).

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Abstract

In July 2017, MAX (Metro African eXpress) was paving the way for an ecommerce boom in Lagos, Nigeria by creating the city's first reliable same-day delivery service. MAX used an on-demand mobile platform to match delivery requests with highly vetted and trained motorcycle couriers. This growing, loudly-branded fleet of 66 contract drivers was making 500 deliveries per day, creating new opportunities for small businesses. Cofounder Tayo Bamiduro was eager to scale, but how? Should MAX continue expanding within Lagos, or was it time to branch out? And should the company continue to focus on its core motorcycle delivery and taxi services, or should it dedicate resources toward converting its proprietary mapping standards and driver licensing into new products? This case is part of the Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/legatum for more information on the collection).

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