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Book chapter
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Reference no. BEP8306
Chapter from: "A Primer on Corporate Governance: Mexico"
Published by: Business Expert Press
Originally published in: 2020
Revision date: 29-Oct-2019

Abstract

Mexico is a land inhabited by several indigenous civilizations and was conquered by Spain in 1521. The country is mostly a racial mix between the Spanish and native cultures. It is a traditionalist society where family, religion, and culture play a key role. The role of the marketplace is constrained by the government and local interest groups such as unions, political parties, commerce chambers, and private firms. The market for corporate control is scarce. Corporate governance codes are voluntary. Corporate ownership is concentrated with few institutional investors. Shareholder activism is uncommon. Corporate boards are single tier in nature. CEO duality is common practice. Boards are made mostly of insiders and shareholder representatives. Independent board members hold minority stakes. This book starts by describing the macro context in which Mexico is embedded. We then focus on its corporate governance system: laws, regulatory bodies, code of good governance, stock market and the peculiarities of local business groups. The central part of the book summarizes key characteristics of board structure and networks in the country. The book ends with interviews of two well-known directors and suggestions to move the governance field forward in Mexico.

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Abstract

Mexico is a land inhabited by several indigenous civilizations and was conquered by Spain in 1521. The country is mostly a racial mix between the Spanish and native cultures. It is a traditionalist society where family, religion, and culture play a key role. The role of the marketplace is constrained by the government and local interest groups such as unions, political parties, commerce chambers, and private firms. The market for corporate control is scarce. Corporate governance codes are voluntary. Corporate ownership is concentrated with few institutional investors. Shareholder activism is uncommon. Corporate boards are single tier in nature. CEO duality is common practice. Boards are made mostly of insiders and shareholder representatives. Independent board members hold minority stakes. This book starts by describing the macro context in which Mexico is embedded. We then focus on its corporate governance system: laws, regulatory bodies, code of good governance, stock market and the peculiarities of local business groups. The central part of the book summarizes key characteristics of board structure and networks in the country. The book ends with interviews of two well-known directors and suggestions to move the governance field forward in Mexico.

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