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Abridged version
-
Reference no. 9-720-426
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 2019
Version: 21 December 2019
Revision date: 16-Jan-2020
Length: 23 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

Supplement to the A case. This case is an abridged version (part 2 of 2) of 'Walmart's Omnichannel Strategy: Revolution or Miscalculation?'. The (B) case describes Walmart's omnichannel strategy in 2018 as it battled Amazon for online retail market share. Walmart aimed to integrate its enormous brick and mortar footprint with its growing e-Commerce business, eg, through merchandise and grocery delivery and order online, pickup in store options. It also followed a two-part acquisition strategy that included specialty retailers such as Shoes.com and digitally native vertical brands that developed their own products and sold them directly to consumers, such as ModCloth and Bonobos. In 2016, it acquired the e-Commerce retailer Jet.com. In addition to building its online marketplace, Walmart hoped to leverage its existing assets, such as its massive network of retail stores and thriving grocery business, in the fight against Amazon. The case poses the question: Could Walmart successfully compete against Amazon and other online retailers in areas such as grocery delivery, product selection, shipping costs, and delivery times?
Locations:
Industry:
Size:
> 1 billion; Fortune 500
Other setting(s):
2016-2019

About

Abstract

Supplement to the A case. This case is an abridged version (part 2 of 2) of 'Walmart's Omnichannel Strategy: Revolution or Miscalculation?'. The (B) case describes Walmart's omnichannel strategy in 2018 as it battled Amazon for online retail market share. Walmart aimed to integrate its enormous brick and mortar footprint with its growing e-Commerce business, eg, through merchandise and grocery delivery and order online, pickup in store options. It also followed a two-part acquisition strategy that included specialty retailers such as Shoes.com and digitally native vertical brands that developed their own products and sold them directly to consumers, such as ModCloth and Bonobos. In 2016, it acquired the e-Commerce retailer Jet.com. In addition to building its online marketplace, Walmart hoped to leverage its existing assets, such as its massive network of retail stores and thriving grocery business, in the fight against Amazon. The case poses the question: Could Walmart successfully compete against Amazon and other online retailers in areas such as grocery delivery, product selection, shipping costs, and delivery times?

Settings

Locations:
Industry:
Size:
> 1 billion; Fortune 500
Other setting(s):
2016-2019

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