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Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Stanford Business School
Originally published in: 2020
Version: 5 March 2020
Length: 13 pages
Data source: Field research
Notes: This item is part of a free case collection. For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

In the process of searching for a preschool for his son, Sepandar 'Sep' Kamvar realized the ideal school he was envisioning did not yet exist. He decided to start a school that would serve to connect those involved in the school both to themselves and each other, and would also serve as a catalyst for connecting the world around them. As the first school grew into a school network, Kamvar created an environment where students and teachers had autonomy. Matthew Kramer then took the baton from Kamvar to build Wildflower Foundation, an organization that would support existing Wildflower schools and help interested teachers found Wildflower schools in new geographies. The Foundation operated collaboratively, rather than by diktat, even in areas often tightly owned by executives. As the realities of starting and operating schools became more routine, the Wildflower network began to look toward a longer-term way to impact their wider community. This included intentionally fostering a more diverse student body and supporting teachers of color. All along, Wildflower had considered its schools to be labs dedicated to understanding children and advancing the Montessori method. Two tenants guided the technology implemented in the schools: they needed to be self-limiting, instead of self-reinforcing, and their work should be accessible and empowering to all. This case about Wildflower Schools demonstrated how software can play a role in perpetuating an organization's DNA. This case is part of the Stanford Graduate School of Business free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/stanfordfreecases for more information on the collection).

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2020.

Geographical setting

Region:
Americas
Country:
United States
Location:
Boston

About

Abstract

In the process of searching for a preschool for his son, Sepandar 'Sep' Kamvar realized the ideal school he was envisioning did not yet exist. He decided to start a school that would serve to connect those involved in the school both to themselves and each other, and would also serve as a catalyst for connecting the world around them. As the first school grew into a school network, Kamvar created an environment where students and teachers had autonomy. Matthew Kramer then took the baton from Kamvar to build Wildflower Foundation, an organization that would support existing Wildflower schools and help interested teachers found Wildflower schools in new geographies. The Foundation operated collaboratively, rather than by diktat, even in areas often tightly owned by executives. As the realities of starting and operating schools became more routine, the Wildflower network began to look toward a longer-term way to impact their wider community. This included intentionally fostering a more diverse student body and supporting teachers of color. All along, Wildflower had considered its schools to be labs dedicated to understanding children and advancing the Montessori method. Two tenants guided the technology implemented in the schools: they needed to be self-limiting, instead of self-reinforcing, and their work should be accessible and empowering to all. This case about Wildflower Schools demonstrated how software can play a role in perpetuating an organization's DNA. This case is part of the Stanford Graduate School of Business free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/stanfordfreecases for more information on the collection).

Settings

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2020.

Geographical setting

Region:
Americas
Country:
United States
Location:
Boston

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