Product details

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Published by: International Institute for Management Development (IMD)
Originally published in: 2021
Version: 09.12.2021
Revision date: 11-Feb-2022

Abstract

L'Oreal, the world leader in beauty products, began to rethink its vision for the industry. The world was on the cusp of a digital future full of possibilities. For a company known for its consumer-pleasing beauty products and owner of some the world's most iconic brands, this meant thinking about innovation in a different way. It would no longer mean only providing the best products but also continuously adapting the industry to market needs. Through a combination of goal setting, training and communication, the digital transformation began, first with efforts in marketing, sales and consumer outreach, but supply chain quickly moved to a prominent role in helping address questions about how digitalization would affect the company's products and consumer expectations. Starting with a vision of the CEO, Jean-Paul Agon, the company found itself on a journey to challenge its culture, its approach and even what its value proposition was. Along the way, the supply chain became a force for bringing together the different functions of a large, complex organization to identify and implement new business models in the digital age that cut to the heart of the company's operations.

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2010-2020.

Geographical setting

Region:
World/global
Country:
France

Featured company

L'Oréal
Employees:
10000+
Turnover:
EUR 29 billion
Industry:
Consumer goods

About

Abstract

L'Oreal, the world leader in beauty products, began to rethink its vision for the industry. The world was on the cusp of a digital future full of possibilities. For a company known for its consumer-pleasing beauty products and owner of some the world's most iconic brands, this meant thinking about innovation in a different way. It would no longer mean only providing the best products but also continuously adapting the industry to market needs. Through a combination of goal setting, training and communication, the digital transformation began, first with efforts in marketing, sales and consumer outreach, but supply chain quickly moved to a prominent role in helping address questions about how digitalization would affect the company's products and consumer expectations. Starting with a vision of the CEO, Jean-Paul Agon, the company found itself on a journey to challenge its culture, its approach and even what its value proposition was. Along the way, the supply chain became a force for bringing together the different functions of a large, complex organization to identify and implement new business models in the digital age that cut to the heart of the company's operations.

Settings

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2010-2020.

Geographical setting

Region:
World/global
Country:
France

Featured company

L'Oréal
Employees:
10000+
Turnover:
EUR 29 billion
Industry:
Consumer goods

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