Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
New product
Case
-
Reference no. OATCJ-2083546
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Published by: Open Access Teaching Case Journal
Published in: 2023
Notes: This item is part of a free case collection. For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

On a hot July evening in the summer of 2022, Payton Mackey was walking back to her summer sublet in London, Ontario, Canada, frustrated and leafing through her prototype sketches. She had several product designs for her business, Fidgetry, and was anxious to get a physical product in her hands to show prospective customers. Her entrepreneurship program mentor had asked her why a prototype was so important. 'I need to physically hold it; I need to know exactly what it will be before I can proceed', Mackey had proclaimed. 'How can I get customer feedback, build marketing materials, or do forecasting if I don't have one?'. Mackey is a student in an entrepreneurship incubator who is exploring how to get a physical prototype made for her business idea. She explores various means of production, including CNC, mold and additive production and the use of CAD files. She also explores the benefits and drawbacks of local, national, and international manufacturing and the idea of outsourcing as part of a business model.

Teaching and learning

This item is suitable for undergraduate courses.

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2022.

Geographical setting

Region:
Americas
Country:
Canada

About

Abstract

On a hot July evening in the summer of 2022, Payton Mackey was walking back to her summer sublet in London, Ontario, Canada, frustrated and leafing through her prototype sketches. She had several product designs for her business, Fidgetry, and was anxious to get a physical product in her hands to show prospective customers. Her entrepreneurship program mentor had asked her why a prototype was so important. 'I need to physically hold it; I need to know exactly what it will be before I can proceed', Mackey had proclaimed. 'How can I get customer feedback, build marketing materials, or do forecasting if I don't have one?'. Mackey is a student in an entrepreneurship incubator who is exploring how to get a physical prototype made for her business idea. She explores various means of production, including CNC, mold and additive production and the use of CAD files. She also explores the benefits and drawbacks of local, national, and international manufacturing and the idea of outsourcing as part of a business model.

Teaching and learning

This item is suitable for undergraduate courses.

Settings

Time period

The events covered by this case took place in 2022.

Geographical setting

Region:
Americas
Country:
Canada

Related