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Abstract

The case integrates issues in service operations, organisation behaviour and applications of management science models such as simulation and queuing theory. A complete analysis of the case includes understanding process flows, computing utilisation levels and using models of the stochastic arrival rate and service rates of the existing and proposed systems. In addition, the student has to deal with the managerial issues that are involved in running an ambulatory care centre. This case can be used in any of the following stand-alone courses: quantitative methods and decision sciences, operations management, service operations, human resources and organisational behaviour. Since this case was developed and used in a combined quantitative methods, operations, and organisational behaviour cluster class at Babson College, the teaching note will address all of these issues. The Primary Care Clinic (PCC) is the only walk-in clinic on campus and presently works under a 'triage' system. The Student Health Services (along with PCC) is scheduled to move to a new facility and this move is seen by the director of the PCC as a good opportunity to review and improve on the present service delivery process and system. Three broad objectives have been identified for the new system: (1) reduce the waiting time for seeing a healthcare provider; (2) transform the perception of the clinic as an impersonal bureaucracy; and (3) improve the student perceptions (especially non-users) about the performance and effectiveness of the PCC. In order to achieve these objectives, a new system of teams of clinicians (doctors and nurse practitioners) has been proposed.

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Abstract

The case integrates issues in service operations, organisation behaviour and applications of management science models such as simulation and queuing theory. A complete analysis of the case includes understanding process flows, computing utilisation levels and using models of the stochastic arrival rate and service rates of the existing and proposed systems. In addition, the student has to deal with the managerial issues that are involved in running an ambulatory care centre. This case can be used in any of the following stand-alone courses: quantitative methods and decision sciences, operations management, service operations, human resources and organisational behaviour. Since this case was developed and used in a combined quantitative methods, operations, and organisational behaviour cluster class at Babson College, the teaching note will address all of these issues. The Primary Care Clinic (PCC) is the only walk-in clinic on campus and presently works under a 'triage' system. The Student Health Services (along with PCC) is scheduled to move to a new facility and this move is seen by the director of the PCC as a good opportunity to review and improve on the present service delivery process and system. Three broad objectives have been identified for the new system: (1) reduce the waiting time for seeing a healthcare provider; (2) transform the perception of the clinic as an impersonal bureaucracy; and (3) improve the student perceptions (especially non-users) about the performance and effectiveness of the PCC. In order to achieve these objectives, a new system of teams of clinicians (doctors and nurse practitioners) has been proposed.

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