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Compact case
Authors: Mark Jenkins
Published by: Cranfield School of Management
Published in: 2003

Abstract

This is the fifth of a five-case series (399-001-1 to 399-004-1 and 303- 094-1). This collection of five mini cases, to be used in conjunction with each other, is used to address the issues of achieving competitive advantage in a highly competitive, technological and international context. The first case is an introduction and outlines the competitive nature of Formula One and the fact that this is an industry of sophisticated multi-million pound organisations competing at the highest international level. The subsequent cases each focus on a Formula 1 constructor who achieved sustained competitive advantage in a particular period: (B) Ferrari 1975-1977; (C) McLaren 1988-1991; (D) Williams 1992-1994, (E) Ferrari 1999-2002. The four constructor cases are designed to be addressed by different syndicate groups allowing the plenary session to draw out the learning points across the three cases. They are used to illustrate a number of principles relating to the resource based view of strategy, such as: defining sources of competitive advantage; the problems of imitation and appropriation of key resources; and the idiosyncratic and path-dependent nature of sources of advantage.
Location:
Size:
400 employees
Other setting(s):
1999-2002

About

Abstract

This is the fifth of a five-case series (399-001-1 to 399-004-1 and 303- 094-1). This collection of five mini cases, to be used in conjunction with each other, is used to address the issues of achieving competitive advantage in a highly competitive, technological and international context. The first case is an introduction and outlines the competitive nature of Formula One and the fact that this is an industry of sophisticated multi-million pound organisations competing at the highest international level. The subsequent cases each focus on a Formula 1 constructor who achieved sustained competitive advantage in a particular period: (B) Ferrari 1975-1977; (C) McLaren 1988-1991; (D) Williams 1992-1994, (E) Ferrari 1999-2002. The four constructor cases are designed to be addressed by different syndicate groups allowing the plenary session to draw out the learning points across the three cases. They are used to illustrate a number of principles relating to the resource based view of strategy, such as: defining sources of competitive advantage; the problems of imitation and appropriation of key resources; and the idiosyncratic and path-dependent nature of sources of advantage.

Settings

Location:
Size:
400 employees
Other setting(s):
1999-2002

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