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Authors: Fernando Chaddad (Accenture, Brazil)
Published in: 2002
Length: 31 pages
Data source: Published sources
Topics: Strategy; CEO agenda

Abstract

In 2000, Bradesco was amongst the world's top 50 banks measured by revenues with a figure of USD14.1billion. That year, it was also the largest financial institution in Brazil and in Latin America. As a universal bank, Bradesco engaged in a wide variety of activities in addition to retail banking, such as commercial lending, real estate, investment banking, mortgages, insurance and consumer lending. Following the Real Plan in 1994, the end of hyperinflation generated consolidation forces that were only starting to change the landscape of Brazilian finance. Whereas over 250 retail banks made a comfortable living in early 1990s hyperinflationary Brazil, this number was expected to fall drastically in the early 2000s, with only a handful of institutions dominating the industry. Conservative Bradesco was expected to belong to - and probably lead - this select group. But it would not be easy. An intense battle built up as powerful new entrants from overseas, such as UK-based HSBC (The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) and BSCH (Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) from Spain, joined the highly capitalised, technology-intensive 'Big Three' locals in the profitable, growing Brazilian financial services market.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
20,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1990-2002

About

Abstract

In 2000, Bradesco was amongst the world's top 50 banks measured by revenues with a figure of USD14.1billion. That year, it was also the largest financial institution in Brazil and in Latin America. As a universal bank, Bradesco engaged in a wide variety of activities in addition to retail banking, such as commercial lending, real estate, investment banking, mortgages, insurance and consumer lending. Following the Real Plan in 1994, the end of hyperinflation generated consolidation forces that were only starting to change the landscape of Brazilian finance. Whereas over 250 retail banks made a comfortable living in early 1990s hyperinflationary Brazil, this number was expected to fall drastically in the early 2000s, with only a handful of institutions dominating the industry. Conservative Bradesco was expected to belong to - and probably lead - this select group. But it would not be easy. An intense battle built up as powerful new entrants from overseas, such as UK-based HSBC (The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) and BSCH (Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) from Spain, joined the highly capitalised, technology-intensive 'Big Three' locals in the profitable, growing Brazilian financial services market.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
20,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1990-2002

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