Product details

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Authors: Fernando Chaddad (Accenture, Brazil)
Published in: 2002
Length: 23 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

When airline deregulation hit Brazil in the 1990s, (Transportes AÚreos MarÝlia SA) TAM Airlines became a showcase on how to capitalise on change. TAM enjoyed a cult-like following and became Latin America''s fastest-growing airline as well as one of the world''s most versatile and innovative carriers according to industry analysts. Building on its unique culture to bring together employees and passengers around its unmistakable way of flying, TAM came from nowhere in the early 1990s to over US$1 billion of revenues in 2000, channelling its consistently positive cash flows toward one of the continent''s youngest jet fleets, as well as targeted acquisitions. In the early 2000s, it seemed best positioned to emerge as the dominant airline in Mercosur - the free trade area that comprised: (1) Argentina; (2) Brazil; (3) Paraguay; and (4) Uruguay. But as a sequence of bad surprises hit TAM hard in the seemingly interminable fiscal year 2001, TAM management regrouped and resumed work towards the achievement of the carrier''s vision of one day dominating nothing but ''everything east of the Andes''.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
150,000 employees
Other setting(s):
Early 2000s

About

Abstract

When airline deregulation hit Brazil in the 1990s, (Transportes AÚreos MarÝlia SA) TAM Airlines became a showcase on how to capitalise on change. TAM enjoyed a cult-like following and became Latin America''s fastest-growing airline as well as one of the world''s most versatile and innovative carriers according to industry analysts. Building on its unique culture to bring together employees and passengers around its unmistakable way of flying, TAM came from nowhere in the early 1990s to over US$1 billion of revenues in 2000, channelling its consistently positive cash flows toward one of the continent''s youngest jet fleets, as well as targeted acquisitions. In the early 2000s, it seemed best positioned to emerge as the dominant airline in Mercosur - the free trade area that comprised: (1) Argentina; (2) Brazil; (3) Paraguay; and (4) Uruguay. But as a sequence of bad surprises hit TAM hard in the seemingly interminable fiscal year 2001, TAM management regrouped and resumed work towards the achievement of the carrier''s vision of one day dominating nothing but ''everything east of the Andes''.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
150,000 employees
Other setting(s):
Early 2000s

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