Product details

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Authors: Edna Reid; Tom Gleave
Published by: Asian Business Case Centre
Published in: 2002
Length: 6 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (302-175-1 and 302-176-1). In late 1998, Singapore-based High-Tech Associates Pte Ltd (High-Tech) embraced the e-business challenge by developing a new stream of services designed to satisfy two key client groups: upstart dotcoms promising to offer innovative ways of doing business and ''old economy'' companies interested in using the Internet to achieve great cost and business process efficiencies. The marketing consultancy enjoyed strong demand for these services for 15 months, as Internet usage skyrocketed. However, beginning in March 2000, investor sentiment towards Internet ventures turned sharply downward as serious doubts set in concerning the long-term viability of many related initiatives. Global activities began to decline and left companies like High-Tech scrambling to find new revenue streams to support their operations. By December 2001, Sara Fraser, now High-Tech''s sole director, claimed that a ''general malaise'' had set in Singapore''s business scene. This prompted her to consider developing a completely new service line - customer relationship management consulting and project implementation. The question that now needed to be answered was whether or not this was a viable growth opportunity for High-Tech Associates.
Location:
Size:
Small
Other setting(s):
1998-2001

About

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (302-175-1 and 302-176-1). In late 1998, Singapore-based High-Tech Associates Pte Ltd (High-Tech) embraced the e-business challenge by developing a new stream of services designed to satisfy two key client groups: upstart dotcoms promising to offer innovative ways of doing business and ''old economy'' companies interested in using the Internet to achieve great cost and business process efficiencies. The marketing consultancy enjoyed strong demand for these services for 15 months, as Internet usage skyrocketed. However, beginning in March 2000, investor sentiment towards Internet ventures turned sharply downward as serious doubts set in concerning the long-term viability of many related initiatives. Global activities began to decline and left companies like High-Tech scrambling to find new revenue streams to support their operations. By December 2001, Sara Fraser, now High-Tech''s sole director, claimed that a ''general malaise'' had set in Singapore''s business scene. This prompted her to consider developing a completely new service line - customer relationship management consulting and project implementation. The question that now needed to be answered was whether or not this was a viable growth opportunity for High-Tech Associates.

Settings

Location:
Size:
Small
Other setting(s):
1998-2001

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