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Published by: London Business School
Published in: 2002
Length: 17 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

This case study traces the experience of Unilever Group in developing a strategic sourcing approach, with a particular emphasis on the ongoing implementation of the strategy in Europe. The case provides lessons for any company considering the adoption of strategic sourcing as a way to drive out cost, and it addresses some of the emerging benefits and challenges of Internet-based purchasing systems. While the jury is still out with regard to areas such as people empowerment and process optimisation, Internet enabled strategic sourcing appears to be emerging as one of the success stories of the ''dotcom bubble''. Indeed, companies who turn their backs on this approach due to broader scepticism towards e-business initiatives may see their long-term competitiveness eroded by companies, such as Unilever, who are driving ahead with technology-enabled strategies.
Location:
Size:
250,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-2002

About

Abstract

This case study traces the experience of Unilever Group in developing a strategic sourcing approach, with a particular emphasis on the ongoing implementation of the strategy in Europe. The case provides lessons for any company considering the adoption of strategic sourcing as a way to drive out cost, and it addresses some of the emerging benefits and challenges of Internet-based purchasing systems. While the jury is still out with regard to areas such as people empowerment and process optimisation, Internet enabled strategic sourcing appears to be emerging as one of the success stories of the ''dotcom bubble''. Indeed, companies who turn their backs on this approach due to broader scepticism towards e-business initiatives may see their long-term competitiveness eroded by companies, such as Unilever, who are driving ahead with technology-enabled strategies.

Settings

Location:
Size:
250,000 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-2002

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