Product details

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Compact case
Published by: Cranfield School of Management
Published in: 2002
Length: 4 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (602-031-1 and 602-032-1). Domino Printing Sciences is an international world-leader in date coding technology. The company designs and manufacture inkjet printers, which are used in mass production applications - for ''use-by'' date marking, on a wide variety of products including foods. In 1998, however, management recognised the need to develop new products based on laser technology and therefore faced the task of acquiring this technology from outside. The teaching objectives of the case series are: (1) to demonstrate the need for companies to monitor the development of new technologies; and (2) to illustrate the salient issues in the acquisition of technology, as opposed to in-house development. The case series has been found to be an effective vehicle for teaching technology management to MBA students, managers and undergraduates. The comprehensive teaching note summarises the experience gained in teaching this case over the last two years. A video ''602-031-3'' is available to accompany the case series.
Location:
Size:
1,400 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-1999

About

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (602-031-1 and 602-032-1). Domino Printing Sciences is an international world-leader in date coding technology. The company designs and manufacture inkjet printers, which are used in mass production applications - for ''use-by'' date marking, on a wide variety of products including foods. In 1998, however, management recognised the need to develop new products based on laser technology and therefore faced the task of acquiring this technology from outside. The teaching objectives of the case series are: (1) to demonstrate the need for companies to monitor the development of new technologies; and (2) to illustrate the salient issues in the acquisition of technology, as opposed to in-house development. The case series has been found to be an effective vehicle for teaching technology management to MBA students, managers and undergraduates. The comprehensive teaching note summarises the experience gained in teaching this case over the last two years. A video ''602-031-3'' is available to accompany the case series.

Settings

Location:
Size:
1,400 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-1999

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