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Case
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Reference no. 902-038-1
Authors: Jamie Anderson
Published by: London Business School
Published in: 2002
Length: 21 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

The software giant, Microsoft, is a mere corporate stripling. Yet, around its formidable success lies an equally indomitable mystique. It is phenomenally successful. Since its inception, Microsoft has consistently been underestimated by its competitors. Giants like AOL/Time Warner, Palm and Sony have each had a run at Microsoft and failed. And companies like Nokia, Apple, Novell, Borland, WordPerfect, Lotus Development, Sun, IBM, Netscape, Oracle and SAP either disappeared or have lost market share in their battles with Microsoft. To understand Microsoft''s success, we need to look elsewhere: at the new rules for the ''experience'' economy - where customers value products and services that can enhance the quality of their life experience. This case provides an overview of Microsoft''s corporate strategy and how the company is positioning itself to dominate the ''high ground'' for business models in the forthcoming networked economy.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
20,000 employees
Other setting(s):
2000-2002

About

Abstract

The software giant, Microsoft, is a mere corporate stripling. Yet, around its formidable success lies an equally indomitable mystique. It is phenomenally successful. Since its inception, Microsoft has consistently been underestimated by its competitors. Giants like AOL/Time Warner, Palm and Sony have each had a run at Microsoft and failed. And companies like Nokia, Apple, Novell, Borland, WordPerfect, Lotus Development, Sun, IBM, Netscape, Oracle and SAP either disappeared or have lost market share in their battles with Microsoft. To understand Microsoft''s success, we need to look elsewhere: at the new rules for the ''experience'' economy - where customers value products and services that can enhance the quality of their life experience. This case provides an overview of Microsoft''s corporate strategy and how the company is positioning itself to dominate the ''high ground'' for business models in the forthcoming networked economy.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
20,000 employees
Other setting(s):
2000-2002

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