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Case
-
Reference no. 301-165-1
Published by: Asian Business Case Centre
Originally published in: 2001
Version: 15 Apr 2004
Length: 17 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

This is the first of a two-case series (301-165-1 and 301-166-1). The case describes how Singapore Airlines (SIA) evolved from a fledging player in the 1960s into an industry leader in the airline industry. In the process, SIA rewrote the rules for competition and earned accolades for its excellent aviation record, young fleet of planes and a reputation for delighting customers. Bilateral air service agreements negotiated between individual nations limited the routes of a given airline and hence the airline''s growth. The global airline industry had responded to this challenge with a mix of acquisition, strategic alliances (for example the STAR alliance) and related diversification strategies. SIA had adopted all three strategies with considerable success in the past. But would these strategies be sustainable in the near future? What course of action should SIA undertake? An industry note is available to accompany the case ''301-165-6''.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
Large
Other setting(s):
1970-2000

About

Abstract

This is the first of a two-case series (301-165-1 and 301-166-1). The case describes how Singapore Airlines (SIA) evolved from a fledging player in the 1960s into an industry leader in the airline industry. In the process, SIA rewrote the rules for competition and earned accolades for its excellent aviation record, young fleet of planes and a reputation for delighting customers. Bilateral air service agreements negotiated between individual nations limited the routes of a given airline and hence the airline''s growth. The global airline industry had responded to this challenge with a mix of acquisition, strategic alliances (for example the STAR alliance) and related diversification strategies. SIA had adopted all three strategies with considerable success in the past. But would these strategies be sustainable in the near future? What course of action should SIA undertake? An industry note is available to accompany the case ''301-165-6''.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
Large
Other setting(s):
1970-2000

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