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Case
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Reference no. 501-016-1
Subject category: Marketing
Authors: Bharat Rao (Polytechnic Institute of New York University)
Published in: 2001

Abstract

This case outlines the emergence of Handspring, Inc and its competitive differentiation strategy in the PDA (Personal Digital Assitant) market. It describes the strategic and marketing challenges faced by the company, and how it formulated a long-term strategy of product innovation. These issues are presented in the backdrop of changing technologies and user needs. The case also describes various competitive threats that the company might face. The primary objective is to help students understand how a coherent product and platform strategy can help a firm to differentiate itself in the marketplace. This case also illustrates how wider technological and industry influences can be viewed either as a threat or opportunity, depending on managerial vision and leadership, tangible and intangible firm resources, marketing and operational execution skills, and the ability to assess changing patterns in the marketplace. This case is primarily written for a graduate class in high-tech marketing and/or strategy.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
258 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-2001

About

Abstract

This case outlines the emergence of Handspring, Inc and its competitive differentiation strategy in the PDA (Personal Digital Assitant) market. It describes the strategic and marketing challenges faced by the company, and how it formulated a long-term strategy of product innovation. These issues are presented in the backdrop of changing technologies and user needs. The case also describes various competitive threats that the company might face. The primary objective is to help students understand how a coherent product and platform strategy can help a firm to differentiate itself in the marketplace. This case also illustrates how wider technological and industry influences can be viewed either as a threat or opportunity, depending on managerial vision and leadership, tangible and intangible firm resources, marketing and operational execution skills, and the ability to assess changing patterns in the marketplace. This case is primarily written for a graduate class in high-tech marketing and/or strategy.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
258 employees
Other setting(s):
1998-2001

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