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Prize winner
Authors: John Mangan (Irish Management Institute (IMI)); James Cunningham (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Published in: 1999

Abstract

This case study explores policy pertaining to the commercial ports sector in Ireland. The case begins with a review of the international trend to reform the administration of ports. The history and role of the commercial ports sector in Ireland is detailed, particularly in the context of Ireland''s ''Celtic Tiger'' economy. The background to a policy change which involved corporatising nine commercial ports (from a total of twenty five ports) is detailed and the impact and effectiveness of this policy change is critiqued. Strategic options for the future development of the sector are then explored. This is a rich case study with many potential learning objectives. The primary objectives are concerned with analysing the environment and development of strategic options. The secondary objectives are concerned with managing strategic change in a public sector context, which is vital to Ireland''s national competitiveness. The case study allows students to gain a greater understanding of how to assess the competitive environment of a sector undergoing structural change, triggered by a combination of Government intervention, and strong international trends regarding port reforms. It affords the students an opportunity to conduct PESTLE analysis and five forces analysis. This case requires students to undertake scenario analysis of this sector, thereby enhancing their understanding of the technique and the strategic implications of each scenario on sectoral stakeholders. This is further enhanced as students have to develop and generate logical strategic options for the commercialised and non commercialised ports. The case study lends itself to exploring the management of strategic change. The students can gain an appreciation of the barriers to change, the role of key stakeholders in triggering change and the extent to which change can be managed.
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
1991-1999

About

Abstract

This case study explores policy pertaining to the commercial ports sector in Ireland. The case begins with a review of the international trend to reform the administration of ports. The history and role of the commercial ports sector in Ireland is detailed, particularly in the context of Ireland''s ''Celtic Tiger'' economy. The background to a policy change which involved corporatising nine commercial ports (from a total of twenty five ports) is detailed and the impact and effectiveness of this policy change is critiqued. Strategic options for the future development of the sector are then explored. This is a rich case study with many potential learning objectives. The primary objectives are concerned with analysing the environment and development of strategic options. The secondary objectives are concerned with managing strategic change in a public sector context, which is vital to Ireland''s national competitiveness. The case study allows students to gain a greater understanding of how to assess the competitive environment of a sector undergoing structural change, triggered by a combination of Government intervention, and strong international trends regarding port reforms. It affords the students an opportunity to conduct PESTLE analysis and five forces analysis. This case requires students to undertake scenario analysis of this sector, thereby enhancing their understanding of the technique and the strategic implications of each scenario on sectoral stakeholders. This is further enhanced as students have to develop and generate logical strategic options for the commercialised and non commercialised ports. The case study lends itself to exploring the management of strategic change. The students can gain an appreciation of the barriers to change, the role of key stakeholders in triggering change and the extent to which change can be managed.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
1991-1999

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