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Published by: Asia Case Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong
Published in: 2000
Length: 17 pages
Data source: Generalised experience

Abstract

Law, by definition was jurisdictional, yet in cyberspace it had become increasingly questionable whether laws regulating the physical marketplace were able to be superimposed onto this new marketspace or were they altogether redundant. The collapsing of time and space that Internet-based commerce enabled, had huge implications for international trade. It also raised a host of legal issues, particularly in terms of protecting intellectual property rights in copyright and trade marks, taxation on the Internet, privacy and consumer protection, liabilities for the acts of Internet users, and content and service regulation. This case outlines the international implications of 'doing business' on the Internet. While the issues of 'multi-jurisdictional compliance' are wide- ranging, an example in the case draws attention to the protection of intellectual property rights. In particular, issues related to the use of trade marks on websites, in hyperlinks or as metatags are raised, as are the implications for registered trade mark owners in cyberspace.
Other setting(s):
1990s

About

Abstract

Law, by definition was jurisdictional, yet in cyberspace it had become increasingly questionable whether laws regulating the physical marketplace were able to be superimposed onto this new marketspace or were they altogether redundant. The collapsing of time and space that Internet-based commerce enabled, had huge implications for international trade. It also raised a host of legal issues, particularly in terms of protecting intellectual property rights in copyright and trade marks, taxation on the Internet, privacy and consumer protection, liabilities for the acts of Internet users, and content and service regulation. This case outlines the international implications of 'doing business' on the Internet. While the issues of 'multi-jurisdictional compliance' are wide- ranging, an example in the case draws attention to the protection of intellectual property rights. In particular, issues related to the use of trade marks on websites, in hyperlinks or as metatags are raised, as are the implications for registered trade mark owners in cyberspace.

Settings

Other setting(s):
1990s

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