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Authors: P Domadenik (Univerza v Ljubljana); Janez Prasnikar (University of Ljubljana School of Economics and Business)
Published in: 1999
Length: 12 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

The case raises a series of related questions concerning the problems of firms in the process of transition from self-management to market economy. Most Slovenian firms lost a major part of their market when Slovenia declared independence in 1991. Demanding customers and powerful competition in foreign markets forced the firms to rationalise their production and continuously improve their products to achieve the defined quality standards. If the firms want to survive in foreign markets they should invest in modern production capacities. Another characteristic of Slovenian firms is ''employeeism'', which gradually drains the company by undermining its fundamentals. The case can be quite exacting since a lot of information that needs systematic ranking is out in front of the student. In spite of that, it can be presented to a relatively broad executive audience and undergraduate students that are interested in the problems of transition economies. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.
Location:
Size:
Medium
Other setting(s):
1992-1996

About

Abstract

The case raises a series of related questions concerning the problems of firms in the process of transition from self-management to market economy. Most Slovenian firms lost a major part of their market when Slovenia declared independence in 1991. Demanding customers and powerful competition in foreign markets forced the firms to rationalise their production and continuously improve their products to achieve the defined quality standards. If the firms want to survive in foreign markets they should invest in modern production capacities. Another characteristic of Slovenian firms is ''employeeism'', which gradually drains the company by undermining its fundamentals. The case can be quite exacting since a lot of information that needs systematic ranking is out in front of the student. In spite of that, it can be presented to a relatively broad executive audience and undergraduate students that are interested in the problems of transition economies. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.

Settings

Location:
Size:
Medium
Other setting(s):
1992-1996

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