Product details

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Published by: London Business School
Published in: 1999
Length: 32 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

Siemens Nixdorf Information Systems (SNI) was formed in 1990 through the merger of Nixdorf and the computing division of Siemens. The complexities of integrating two companies with two very different cultures, combined with a worldwide recession and massive technological and market changes in the industry, produced a constant flow of red ink from 1990 to 1994 when Serhard Schulmeyer was brought in as the new CEO. By 1997 the results were impressive: the firm had returned to profit, its organisation had been reshaped, and employee commitment and morale were on the rise. This case traces this turnaround from the perspective of three different managers - Schulmeyer, at the top, as the overall leader of the transformation process; Robert Hoog, a divisional director, as he builds on the ''top-down'' forces to curve out the change agenda within his own division; and Klaus Karl, a young software engineer and team leader within Hoog''s division, as he tries to both respond and contribute to SMI''s radical change. Overall, the case illustrates the interactions among a top-down, a bottom-up and middle-up-down change process, and the roles of top, middle and front line managers within each of these interacting processes.
Location:
Size:
DEM12 billion revenues in 1996
Other setting(s):
1997

About

Abstract

Siemens Nixdorf Information Systems (SNI) was formed in 1990 through the merger of Nixdorf and the computing division of Siemens. The complexities of integrating two companies with two very different cultures, combined with a worldwide recession and massive technological and market changes in the industry, produced a constant flow of red ink from 1990 to 1994 when Serhard Schulmeyer was brought in as the new CEO. By 1997 the results were impressive: the firm had returned to profit, its organisation had been reshaped, and employee commitment and morale were on the rise. This case traces this turnaround from the perspective of three different managers - Schulmeyer, at the top, as the overall leader of the transformation process; Robert Hoog, a divisional director, as he builds on the ''top-down'' forces to curve out the change agenda within his own division; and Klaus Karl, a young software engineer and team leader within Hoog''s division, as he tries to both respond and contribute to SMI''s radical change. Overall, the case illustrates the interactions among a top-down, a bottom-up and middle-up-down change process, and the roles of top, middle and front line managers within each of these interacting processes.

Settings

Location:
Size:
DEM12 billion revenues in 1996
Other setting(s):
1997

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