Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Authors: Nina D Ziv (Polytechnic Institute of New York University)
Published in: 1999

Abstract

BRM is a private technology incubator based in Jerusalem, Israel. This case describes how BRM seeks Israeli entrepreneurs, provides them with operational support, and ultimately launches their start-ups in the United States. BRM''s approach is a bi-national one in which research and development is done in Israel and business development and sales are done in the United States. BRM''s spin-off companies include: Check Point, a leader in network security and BackWeb, a specialised ''push technology'' company. The case explores whether BRM''s approach is the optimal or even an effective way to nurture entrepreneurs. It also examines the challenges facing high-tech companies which are far from the technology marketplace, and it poses the question of whether it is possible to conduct research and development in a remote location and still dominate or help create the next ''technology wave''. The innovation implications of BRM''s US-centric business development approach on the continued growth and technology development prowess of non-US high-tech centres in Israel and elsewhere are also addressed in this case.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
50 employees
Other setting(s):
1999

About

Abstract

BRM is a private technology incubator based in Jerusalem, Israel. This case describes how BRM seeks Israeli entrepreneurs, provides them with operational support, and ultimately launches their start-ups in the United States. BRM''s approach is a bi-national one in which research and development is done in Israel and business development and sales are done in the United States. BRM''s spin-off companies include: Check Point, a leader in network security and BackWeb, a specialised ''push technology'' company. The case explores whether BRM''s approach is the optimal or even an effective way to nurture entrepreneurs. It also examines the challenges facing high-tech companies which are far from the technology marketplace, and it poses the question of whether it is possible to conduct research and development in a remote location and still dominate or help create the next ''technology wave''. The innovation implications of BRM''s US-centric business development approach on the continued growth and technology development prowess of non-US high-tech centres in Israel and elsewhere are also addressed in this case.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
50 employees
Other setting(s):
1999

Related