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Supporting video
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Reference no. 398-048-3
Authors: Pierre Dussauge (HEC Paris)
Published in: 1998
Length: 16 minutes
Data source: Field research
Notes: File size 1.44GB. Click for more information.

Abstract

This supporting video is to accompany the case. Domino's Pizza, the world leader in pizza delivery, was engaged, since the early 1990s, in a rapid process of international expansion. By 1996, operations had been initiated in almost 50 countries. While the company appears to have been extremely successful in some countries (such as Japan, Mexico and the UK) it has also failed in others (Germany, Spain, France and the Czech Republic), and top management don't clearly understand what determines success or failure. By analysing the main aspects of Domino's organisation and operations, in particular its franchise system, as well as data on its operations in a range of different countries, students can identify consistent patterns of either success or failure in specific international markets. Discussion of the case should then lead to the conclusion that pizza delivery is neither a totally global business nor a purely local one. In such a context, international success is determined by the company's ability to transfer its standardised processes and procedures to the target countries while at the same time adapting to local conditions and tastes. Analysis of the data provided in the case shows that Domino's was successful in those countries where it managed to combine these two aspects and unsuccessful where it focused too exclusively on either of these two dimensions.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
Large, USD3 billion in sales
Other setting(s):
1996

About

Abstract

This supporting video is to accompany the case. Domino's Pizza, the world leader in pizza delivery, was engaged, since the early 1990s, in a rapid process of international expansion. By 1996, operations had been initiated in almost 50 countries. While the company appears to have been extremely successful in some countries (such as Japan, Mexico and the UK) it has also failed in others (Germany, Spain, France and the Czech Republic), and top management don't clearly understand what determines success or failure. By analysing the main aspects of Domino's organisation and operations, in particular its franchise system, as well as data on its operations in a range of different countries, students can identify consistent patterns of either success or failure in specific international markets. Discussion of the case should then lead to the conclusion that pizza delivery is neither a totally global business nor a purely local one. In such a context, international success is determined by the company's ability to transfer its standardised processes and procedures to the target countries while at the same time adapting to local conditions and tastes. Analysis of the data provided in the case shows that Domino's was successful in those countries where it managed to combine these two aspects and unsuccessful where it focused too exclusively on either of these two dimensions.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
Large, USD3 billion in sales
Other setting(s):
1996

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