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Supporting video
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Reference no. 598-039-3
Subject category: Marketing
Authors: Marika Taishoff (Imperial College London); Sandra Vandermerwe (Imperial College London)
Published in: 1998
Length: 19 minutes
Data source: Field research
Notes: Length 20 minutes. File size 1.75GB. Click for more information.

Abstract

This supporting video is to accompany the case series. The abstract to the case is as follows: This case opens in late 1995, Jan Smith, newly appointed Group Strategic Director, was confronted with several challenges: the Club, which had pioneered automotive breakdown and recovery services in the UK nearly 100 years ago, had been steadily losing market share and profitability; advanced vehicle technologies significantly reduced the need for breakdown services; traffic congestion and pollution threatened legislative attempts to control and/or ban cars in urban areas; and, on a more strategic and long term level, the RAC, in Smith's view, lacked a clear brand positioning, a distinct customer proposition, and thus a cohesive strategic direction. By the end of case A, the issues to be resolved are therefore mainfold: to determine why the RAC was losing market share; to identify and weigh, give the competitive, strategic and environmental situation, the strategic options available for the service company, and finally to devise and implement a strategic marketing plan to support the needed repositioning.
Location:
Size:
6 million members
Other setting(s):
1995-1998

About

Abstract

This supporting video is to accompany the case series. The abstract to the case is as follows: This case opens in late 1995, Jan Smith, newly appointed Group Strategic Director, was confronted with several challenges: the Club, which had pioneered automotive breakdown and recovery services in the UK nearly 100 years ago, had been steadily losing market share and profitability; advanced vehicle technologies significantly reduced the need for breakdown services; traffic congestion and pollution threatened legislative attempts to control and/or ban cars in urban areas; and, on a more strategic and long term level, the RAC, in Smith's view, lacked a clear brand positioning, a distinct customer proposition, and thus a cohesive strategic direction. By the end of case A, the issues to be resolved are therefore mainfold: to determine why the RAC was losing market share; to identify and weigh, give the competitive, strategic and environmental situation, the strategic options available for the service company, and finally to devise and implement a strategic marketing plan to support the needed repositioning.

Settings

Location:
Size:
6 million members
Other setting(s):
1995-1998

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